Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with disability have the right to live their life their way whether they are male, female, multicultural or a member of the LGBTIQA+ community.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability have the same rights as non-disabled people. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability have the right to:

  • connect to their country andtheir culture
  • participate in community
  • have access to appropriate services and supports
  • form relationships and live with who they want
  • travel any place they want
  • access to education
  • freedom from violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation
  • access to Justice
  • access to fresh food and water
  • a safe place to live

What is an advocate?

An advocate is a person or an organisation that helps you speak up for your rights when you feel you can’t on your own.

What is advocacy?

Advocacy can be the different ways an advocate can help you to speak up for your rights and having a say about decisions that affect your life.

Advocacy can help you with your right to speak up if you are being discriminated against or not being treated as good as people without a disability.

Advocacy could also be a family member, a friend or someone you trust to speak on your behalf.

Advocacy can also be professional advice and support and the right to be properly represented.

Human rights are important knowledge for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability to know and use in everyday life.

You can find out more about the different types of Advocacy and your rights by clicking on the boxes below.

INDIVIDUAL ADVOCACY

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LEGAL ADVOCACY

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SELF ADVOCACY

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SYSTEMIC ADVOCACY

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